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Two major routes lead into the city of New Vegas from the south: Interstate 15 and Highway 95.Fallout: New Vegas loading screens

Highway 95 (or Route 95) is a pre-War freeway in the Mojave Wasteland in 2281.

Background[edit | edit source]

The highway slowly decayed for two centuries until the New California Republic established itself in the Mojave Wasteland. Although it was primarily an auxiliary route into New Vegas and Hoover Dam, with I-15 preferred by both the NCR and traders for the direct route to the city and Camp McCarran.[1][2][3]

However, the situation changed in 2281, with the NCRCF prison break and Quarry Junction shutdown effectively blocking access to the city on I-15, making Highway 95 the only other reliable route to and from New Vegas.[4] The increased traffic, even in the face of Legion interference and the loss of Nelson and Camp Searchlight, has led to a commercial boom along the route, particularly for Novac, and the founding of new trade posts like the 188 trading post or Grub n' Gulp rest stop.[4]

Layout[edit | edit source]

Highway 95 runs north to south through New Vegas, winding amidst the landscape and around small towns. It enters the Mojave Wasteland from the northwest, beginning at a radioactive roadblock west of Brooks tumbleweed ranch and north of the Followers safehouse. The highway continues south, intersecting with Nevada State Route 157 and subsequently passing through Freeside.

The roadway rises into an elevated freeway over New Vegas, returning to ground level by the Grub n' Gulp rest stop. The highway meets Highway 93 at the 188 trading post. Further along the route it passes HELIOS One and Novac. Finally, it passes through Camp Searchlight and exits the Mojave Wasteland at Searchlight Airport, in a collapsed tunnel underneath the remains of the runway tarmac.

Appearances[edit | edit source]

Highway 95 appears only in Fallout: New Vegas and also appears on an early version of the game's map.[5]

Behind the scenes[edit | edit source]

  • Highway 95 is based on the real world highway U.S. Route 95.
  • Although it was speculated to be an add-on entry point, the northwest roadblock is only a map ending point.[6]

Gallery[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. The Courier: "Why'd you settle in this dump?"
    Michelle Kerr: "There's more to the 188 than meets the eye. Troops move back and forth on 93 all the time, and 95 is how NCR folks come and go from Vegas. No shortage of customers... so long as Legion raids south of here don't get worse, anyways."
    (Michelle Kerr's dialogue)
  2. Fallout: New Vegas Official Game Guide Collector's Edition pp. 396-397: "[5.02] 188 Trading Post
    Formed after the Powder Ganger break-out down at Primm [4.17] forced traders northward, the intersection of the 95 and 93 (hence "188") is now a bustling Trading spot, catering to the NCR from Boulder City [3.32] and Hoover Dam [3.33] as well as offering good connections down the 95. Start on the eastern side of the intersection."
    (Fallout: New Vegas Official Game Guide Collector's Edition Tour of the Mojave Wasteland)
  3. The Courier: "Why's this place called the 188?"
    Michelle Kerr: "You do know these old roads were numbered, right? We're standing where the 95 and 93 meet. And 95 plus 93 equals... 188."
    (Michelle Kerr's dialogue)
  4. 4.0 4.1 The Courier: "Why's business so good here?"
    Samuel Kerr: "When 15 shut down, 95 became the route NCR citizens use to get to the Strip - or limp back home, after the Strip's drained 'em of caps. We get 'em coming and going. Coming, the suckers flush with caps they saved to gamble on the Strip... ...and going, the same folks, but now they're losers who'll trade you the shirt off their backs so they don't starve before they make it back home. Add in the troopers marching back and forth from McCarran and the Dam, and well, let's just say we don't miss Primm."
    (Samuel Kerr's dialogue)
  5. Early map with roadway signage
  6. J.E. Sawyer on Formspring
Fallout: New Vegas roadways
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