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For the modding tool, see G.E.C.K. (editor).
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This is an overview article which contains background information and cross-game comparisons. For game-specific information and stats, see the articles linked on the right.
Gameplay articles
Fallout 2G.E.C.K.
Fallout 3G.E.C.K.
Fallout 76G.E.C.K.
 
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FNV GECK suitcase.png

There is hope, however. A slim hope that few know of. The old disks speak of an item called the Garden of Eden Creation Kit. It is said that it can bring life to the wasteland.Arroyo elder, Fallout 2 intro

The Garden of Eden Creation Kit (G.E.C.K.) is a terraforming device created by Future-Tec, a division of Vault-Tec Corporation, to ease the process of harnessing the post-nuclear wasteland for Vault dwellers.

Background[edit | edit source]

Developed by Stanislaus Braun, the kit contains the basic amenities needed to establish a post-nuclear settlement.[1] Although advertised as a miracle solution for a land ravaged by nuclear warfare, the G.E.C.K. was based on a variety of assumptions about the post-nuclear world, as its creators had no real way to determine what challenges the survivors of the nuclear war would face.[Fallout Bible 1]

Characteristics[edit | edit source]

Packed into a large, silvered briefcase emblazoned with the kit's abbreviation, the G.E.C.K. was intended to be standard equipment for all Vaults,[2] as a fully self-contained terraforming module capable of creating and sustaining life in a post-War environment. Vault-Tec proudly declared that, "even in the event of total global annihilation, a properly functioning G.E.C.K. will create an earthly paradise."[1] It's possible it could even fertilize pre-conditioned areas on the Moon.[Fallout Bible 2]

In reality, it was a more modest tool. The kit included seed and soil supplements, a fusion power generator (referred to as cold fusion in briefing materials), matter-energy replicators, atmospheric chemical stabilizers and water purifiers.[1] The replicators were advertised as capable of creating food and basic items needed for building new environments.[3]

Reading material and information was included with the kit, including selections from the Library of Congress, a complete set of encyclopedias, and other information that would benefit those trying to survive.[3] These included additional codes for the Vault's systems to allow for the manufacture of additional jumpsuit varieties, weatherproof gear, schematics for force fields, and instructions on creating adobe buildings from raw materials, manufacture chemicals to make sandcrete, and even disassemble parts of the Vault to utilize in the process of rebuilding civilization.[Fallout Bible 3][Fallout Bible 4] The Kit itself was designed to be disassembled in the process of rebuilding, as a source of spare parts and energy (thanks to its fusion generator).[4][5]

If chosen to receive a G.E.C.K.,[6] a Vault would be issued two standard G.E.C.K.s as part of the standard inventory package. Some Vaults lacked the two issued G.E.C.K.s, such as Vault 8, of which the extra G.E.C.K. was swapped with Vault 13's surplus water chips.[7][8]

Vault 87 received an unique G.E.C.K., which was capable of collapsing matter within a given radius and recombining it to form a living, breathing, fertile virgin landscape to begin anew.[9]

Variants[edit | edit source]

New California[edit | edit source]

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Gameplay article: Fallout 2

The denizens of Arroyo passed down stories of the "Holy GECK" which they came to believe was a sacred, magical item which could change the wasteland into a paradise. Both Shady Sands and Vault City were built using a G.E.C.K. Arroyo was later reestablished with a G.E.C.K. after the destruction of the Enclave oil rig.

Capital Wasteland[edit | edit source]

GECK FO3.png

Gameplay article: Fallout 3

In Vault 112, the Lone Wanderer learns that in order to make Project Purity work properly, a G.E.C.K. is required. With the kit, one will be able to assist in the purification of water in the Potomac River.

Appalachia[edit | edit source]

F76 GECK.png

Gameplay article: Fallout 76

A part of the experimental Vault 94, the G.E.C.K. in Appalachia was guarded by the vault dwellers until they were overrun and murdered by outsiders. The same individuals that killed the dwellers attempted to destroy the kit. The resulting explosion caused a subsequent mutation and environment that was from then on referred to as the Mire.

Appearances[edit | edit source]

The G.E.C.K. appears in Fallout 2, Fallout 3, Fallout 76 and is mentioned in the Vault Dweller's Survival Guide manual for Fallout.

References[edit | edit source]

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Vault 94 terminal entries; G.E.C.K. monitoring station terminal, Introduction to the G.E.C.K.
  2. Fallout 2 item description: "{36600}{}{G.E.C.K.}"
    "{36601}{}{The Garden of Eden Creation Kit. This unit is standard equipment for all Vault-Tec vaults. A GECK is the resource for rebuilding civilization after the bomb. Just add water and stir.}"
  3. 3.0 3.1 Vault Dweller's Survival Guide; Garden of Eden Creation Kit
  4. Fallout Bible 6: "The GECK isn't really a replicator. It contains a fertilizer system, with a variety of food seeds, soil supplements, and chemicals that could fertilize arid wasteland (and possibly selected sections of the moon's surface pre-conditioned to accept the GECK) into supporting farming. The GECK is intended to be 'disassembled' over the course of its use to help build communities (for example, the cold fusion power source is intended to be used for main city power production), and so on. Anything else people needed, they could simply consult the How To Books/Library of Congress/Encyclopedias in the GECK holodisk library for more knowledge. The pen flashlight was just a bonus."
  5. Randal: "{126}{}{A GECK? That's a Garden of Eden Creation Kit, a kind of gray suitcase looking thing, right? I haven't heard anyone mention one of those in... well, since... almost forever.}" Chosen One: "{129}{}{Do you have one?}" Randal: "{132}{}{Hate to break it to you, friend, but we don't have ours anymore. Used it up to make Vault City...*poof.* All gone.}"
  6. Vault 101 terminal entries; overseer's terminal, Vault-Tec Instructions
  7. Vault City central computer: "{240}{}{From what you can make out in the archives, two GECKs were part of every Vault's standard inventory package. Only one was shipped to Vault 8, however.}
    {241}{}{Cross-reference the GECK shipment information.}
    {244}{}{Due to a shipping error, it appears Vault 8 received a box of surplus water chips intended for another Vault. The other Vault most likely received Vault 8's second GECK.}"
    (Vault City central computer's dialogue)
  8. Vault 101 terminal entries; Overseer's terminal, Vault-Tec Instructions
  9. Fallout 3 GECK Activation: "The G.E.C.K. will collapse all of the matter within its given radius and recombine it to form a living, breathing, fertile virgin landscape and allow life to begin anew. Are you certain you want to do this?"

Fallout Bible[edit | edit source]

  1. Fallout Bible 6: "1b. What may be suitable for planting in the present may not be suitable in 20 yrs. This is esp true I would think in the FO universe with its rather unstable ecosystem. I mean if one really wanted to be certain that what one was panting would grow the best thing to do would be to collect the seeds, spores etc from already growing food sources - these have a guaranteed fertilization rate. After all those corn seeds that were put in the GECK 50 yrs ago now have not sufficiently mutated to endure the new Wasteland (even in a 'normal' ecosystem, the only strains of plant that survive are those that mutate). You're absolutely right. The GECK builders had no idea what the post-nuclear world would be like, and they had no real way to anticipate it, despite their 'thorough tests' (it's doubtful they gave it much thought, to be honest, considering how badly organized the Safehouse project alone was, not to mention the experimental nature of the Vaults) - still, it seems as if the seeds present in the GECK were viable for Vault 8. Evolutionarily speaking using old seeds would be like reintroducing a species that may have gone extinct or at the very least one that is not as cutting edge in its evolution.You bet. And that's dangerous on so many levels! Wheee!Also, as far as How-to books, schematics, sand crete etc.. this seems a bit user heavy. That is a GECK is going to be utterly useless to those who cannot read, or don't have the raw materials to construct a force field, sand crete polymers etc.The GECK designers assumed that the Vault Dwellers would know how to read and how to operate various technologies present in the Vault - they didn't plan for tribals or other contingencies. They also didn't plan on the FEV getting released, or the fact the Vault Dwellers might be attacked by giant mutated scorpions or rats, either. On one hand, you could say they weren't too bright, and on the other hand, you could say they weren't prepared for the future of the human race to become an extended Post-Atomic Horror movie. Silly rabbits! 1a. Wouldn't this [the seeds and soil supplements] date itself rather quickly? Sure, but the government subcommittees sponsoring the research and the GECK contractors (Future-Tec) weren't really concerned about that. They were 'relatively certain' the seeds would be viable in a post-nuclear environment. They had done 'thorough tests,' and 'all conclusions point to this as being the best option.' The GECKs are a miracle... a miracle that they work."
  2. Fallout Bible 6: "The GECK isn't really a replicator. It contains a fertilizer system, with a variety of food seeds, soil supplements, and chemicals that could fertilize arid wasteland (and possibly selected sections of the moon's surface pre-conditioned to accept the GECK) into supporting farming. The GECK is intended to be 'disassembled' over the course of its use to help build communities (for example, the cold fusion power source is intended to be used for main city power production), and so on. Anything else people needed, they could simply consult the How To Books/Library of Congress/Encyclopedias in the GECK holodisk library for more knowledge. The pen flashlight was just a bonus."
  3. Fallout Bible 6: "As for clothing, the GECK contained codes that allowed the Vault to create more varieties of jumpsuits (and weatherproof gear) from their dispensers, which they could do anyway before the GECK. It's possible the GECK contained other codes that could unlock more functionality within the Vault computers that weren't initially available because they would jeopardize the survival of the Vault if they were used or scavenged (or else they would interfere with the Grand Experiment). Also, the GECKs tell the Vault inhabitants how to disassemble sections of their Vault (or take extraneous systems from the Vault) to create new homes and defensive structures on the surface."
  4. Fallout Bible 6: "To close, the 'basic replicator' mentioned in the Fallout 1 manual is nothing more than a selection of seeds and fertilizers. The fact that it can 'build basic items' is intended to mean that you can use it to help break down sections of the Vault into items usable in a community, as well as provide new codes for the machines in the Vault to create new items from the dispensers and computers."
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